2008 record      

Hillary Clinton's lead widened to two percentage points over Donald Trump in the latest IBD/TIPP presidential tracking poll, with a 43% to 41% edge in a four-way matchup. But unrounded results using one more decimal point show Clinton with a smaller 1.2 percentage point lead, 42.6% to 41.4%.

Libertarian Gary Johnson holds 7.5% of the vote, while Green Party standard bearer Jill Stein's support fell to just 2.2% -- less than "other" (2.8%) and "don't know" (3.6%).

However, in a head to head matchup, Clinton now holds a 2.6 percentage point lead over Trump -- 44.2% to 41.6%.

The ninth day of the IBD/TIPP tracking poll included 945 likely voters, with a margin of error of plus-or-minus 3.3 percentage points.  The results are based on a weighted sampling of 340 Democrats, 280 Republicans and 301 people who called themselves either "independents" or "other." The poll results represent a 6-day rolling average.

Previous Days Tracking Results:

 

Oct. 22

Oct. 23

 Oct. 24

 Oct. 25

 Oct. 26

Clinton

40%

41%

41%

42%

42%

Trump

42%

43%

41%

41%

41%

Johnson

7%

7%

8%

8%

8%

Stein

4%

3%

4%

3%

3%

Other

2%

2%

2%

2%

2%

Not sure

5%

4%

4%

4%

4%

                                                                                                                                                                                                    In a Real Clear Politics average of 12 recent national polls, Clinton leads by 5.4 points in a four-way race, 48.4% to 43.0%.

Along with the tracking poll, IBD/TIPP asked a handful of other questions, part of its regular monthly polling efforts. When voters were asked whether they had a "favorable" opinion of each candidate, 42% of Americans said yes for Hillary Clinton, while just 39% said the same about Donald Trump. And while 57% held "unfavorable" opinions of Clinton, some 60% expressed unfavorable feelings for Trump.

Other IBD/TIPP questions show Hillary with a troubling honesty gap. Just 40% in the poll gave Hillary the highest marks for "honesty" and "trustworthiness," while Trump received 47%.

Clinton also suffers on another key question: Who would be better for the economy? Some 43% in the poll said Hillary, while 49% said Donald Trump.

With time dwindling and a little more than a week and a half to go, Trump received some good news from some other polls, where he had been trailing in recent days.

A Fox News Poll put Trump within just three points of Hillary nationally, while a Bloomberg sounding in Florida -- a must-win state for Trump -- put him up 2 points. A handful of other states also showed a tightening race.

Meanwhile, after unveiling plans for his presidency's first 100 days last weekend, Trump revealed on Wednesday a plan for a "new deal for black America" on Wednesday.

Speaking in  Charlotte, N.C., Trump called on African Americans to "embrace a new direction."

"I want to talk about how to grow the African-American middle class, and to provide a new deal for black America," he said in a speech.

"That deal is grounded in three promises: safe communities, great education, and high-paying jobs," he said. "Every African-American citizen in this country is entitled to a government that puts their jobs, wages and security first."

He criticized the "rigged system and failed thinking of yesterday" that Hillary Clinton represents.

"Her campaign offers only the depressing pessimism that says this is as good as it gets, that nothing can ever really change," he said. "Hillary has been there for 30 years and hasn't fixed anything – she's just made it worse."

"African-American citizens have sacrificed so much for our nation. ... Yet too many African-Americans have been left behind," he added.

Trump said he would provide incentives for companies to move into poor areas to bolster employment, and would work to make credit available to African-Americans. As part of his plan, Trump called for giving cities aid to help rebuild infrastructure.

He also promised a "21st century" rewrite of the Glass-Steagall Act, the 1930s law that regulated commercial banks. Then-President Bill Clinton repealed part of the Glass-Steagall Act in 1999. Some subsequently blamed him for helping create the housing meltdown and the subsequent financial crisis.

Trump vowed that his rewrite of the law would help small businesses and entrepreneurs, the engines of job growth in America, gain better access to credit.

Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, criticized Trump for opening a hotel in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday morning, instead of campaigning. And she also promised to "fix" ObamaCare, which next year will see a 25% increase in premiums for its medium-priced plans and which, economists say, appears to be on the verge of collapse.

"We're going to really tackle that," she said in an interview with WHQT HOT 105.1 Miami. "We're going to get co-pays and premiums and deductibles down. We're going to tackle prescription drug costs. And we can do that without ripping away the insurance that people now have. That's the plan of my opponent."

But her campaign was further buffeted by the release of more emails by WikiLeaks, which detailed the convoluted financial and personal connections between the State Department, the Clinton Family Foundation, and a consulting firm run by Hillary's associates.

In the 2011 memo by Doug Band, a Clinton operative, the money flows between the family foundation, Band's Teneo Consulting, and the Clinton family's private business dealings were extensively detailed.

Since 2001, those relationships netted "more than $30 million for (Bill Clinton) personally, with $66 million to be paid out over the next nine years," Band wrote.

Click here to read the original article on the Investor's Business Daily website.

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